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CATEGORIES (articles) > Steering, Suspension, brakes & drivetrain > Components > Leaf spring or Cart spring

Leaf spring or Cart spring


semi-elliptical spring in a 1937 Bugatti Type 57SC

A leaf spring is a simple form of spring, commonly used for the suspension in wheeled vehicles. It is also one of the oldest forms of springing, dating back to medieval times.

Sometimes referred to as a semi-elliptical spring or cart spring, it takes the form of a slender arc-shaped length of spring steel of rectangular cross-section. The centre of the arc provides location for the axle, while tie holes are provided at either end for attaching to the vehicle body. For very heavy vehicles, a leaf spring can be made from several leaves stacked on top of each other in several layers. Leaf springs can serve locating and to some extent damping as well as springing functions.

Leaf springs were very common on automobiles, right up to the 1970s, when the move to front wheel drive, and more sophisticated suspension designs saw automobile manufacturers use superior coil springs instead. However, leaf springs are still used in heavy commercial vehicles such as vans and trucks, and railway carriages. For heavy vehicles, they have the advantage of spreading the load more widely over the vehicle's chassis, whereas coil springs transfer it to a single point.

A more modern implementation is the parabolic leaf spring. This design is characterised by fewer leaves whose thickness varies from centre to ends following a parabolic curve. In this design, inter-leaf friction is unwanted, and therefore there is only contact between the springs at the ends and at the centre where the axle is connected. Spacers prevent contact at other points. Aside from a weight saving, the main advantage of parabolic springs is their greater flexibility, which translates into vehicle ride quality that approaches that of coil springs. There is a trade-off in the form of reduced load carrying capability, however.




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CATEGORIES (articles) > Steering, Suspension, brakes & drivetrain > Components > Leaf spring or Cart spring

 
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